Medieval Rings

les Enluminures
  • ring
  • ring
  • ring
  • ring
  • ring
  • ring
  • ring
  • ring

Lamb Ring by Mosheh Oved

London, 1940s

Silver, gold

  • 11.500 €
  • £10,300
  • $14,000
  • Lamb Ring by Mosheh Oved

    London, 1940s
    Silver, gold
    Weight 26.1 gr.; circumference 50.58 mm.; US size 5 1/2; UK size L; 10.9 mm. at widest point; 30.7 mm. long

    Mosheh Oved was the founder and owner of a renowned antique shop, named Cameo Corner, in the Bloomsbury area of London, near the British Museum. He was an authority on antique jewelry, a writer, sculptor, and poet. His first animal rings were created during the bombing raids of London during the Second World War. Amid one of these raids his wife Sah Oved, a jeweler in her own right, observed how Mosheh’s hands were trembling. Whilst sheltering in the basement of the shop she would give him some modelling wax to steady his hands, and that is when the series of animal rings began. His first attempts were either lambs or a kid on shaky legs. Another touching story from this period is that Mosheh made a ring shaped like a wounded lamb from the metal of his own cuff links as a spontaneous act of giving and sympathy for a client who had recently lost his son in battle.

    Description:
    The heavy silver ring is modelled as a lamb standing on a base with a round opening which forms the hoop. His head with golden eyes is leaning downwards as is his tail. The surface of the silver is hammered to give the lamb a more naturalistic appearance. The ring is in good wearable condition.

    Literature:
    His autobiography a Who’s Who of his time, is full of anecdotal tales of his international customers and notorieties of the period (Mosheh Oved, Vision and Jewels, Autobiographic in Three Parts, London 1952).  For his animal rings, see: Peter Hinks, Twentieth-Century British Jewellery 1900-1980, London and Boston 1983, p. 96; Elsa Zorn Karlin, Jewelry and Metalwork in the Arts and Crafts Tradition, Atglen, Pennsylvania 1993, p. 86. 

    Reference number: 876

  • Hoop

    Also called the shank, the rounded part of the ring that encircles the finger and connects to the bezel at the shoulders.

  • Later

    It is virtually impossible to do justice to the evolution of jewelry from the Baroque period (c. 1700) to Modern times in a short synopsis, but these are a few highlights. Many of the functional aspects of finger-rings continued: they served for betrothal and marriage, for signing and family identification, for memorial purposes, as well as for pure ornament. However, some new types of rings emerge during this period: such as puzzle rings, gimmick rings, perfume rings, and rings that celebrated scientific achievements (e.g., watch rings) are but a few of the examples.

    This time span witnesses the emergence of the “archaeological style,” of which the work of Fortunato Pio Castellani in the 1830s to 1860s is a particularly well-known example, one that fits in the Neo-Classical period. We see the flourishing of other styles related to artistic movements in painting, sculpture, and architecture. These include Art Nouveau and the Arts and Crafts Movement, both beginning around the 1880s, and Art Deco in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s. It also covers the emergence of some of the most famous twentieth-century houses of jewelry, such as Cartier, Charmet, Boucheron, Bulgari, Tiffany’s, Van Cleef & Arpels, and Mellerio, to mention only a few. Jewelry historians responsible for exhibitions in major museums have begun to trace the historical contributions and characterize the styles of jewelry, including rings, not only of these different artistic movements, but also of these great houses.

    Two other sometimes-overlapping categories of later jewelry are of significant import. The first category, “artist jewelry,” consists of jewelry by artists mostly known for their work in other media, such as Picasso, Calder, Dali, Robert Indiana, Louise Bourgeois, Yves Klein, Anish Kapoor, and many others. The second category, “studio jewelry” includes work by modern and contemporary goldsmiths. Among those practicing today of special mention are Wendy Ramshaw and others belonging to the Goldsmith’s Company in London, dedicated to continuing the craft since it received its first royal charter in 1327. Others of different national origins include the Italian Giovanni Corvaja (handled by Adrian Sassoon in London), the American Joel Arthur Rosenthal or JAR of Paris (whose international exhibition was staged at the Metropolitan Museum in New York in 2013), Otto Jakob of Germany, and the newcomer Wallace Chan of China. The experienced viewer-collector, as well as the newcomer to the field, can begin to learn about modern jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston with its dedicated jewelry gallery and specialized curator, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London which houses the William and Judith Bollinger Gallery, and the private collection of Alice and Louis Koch.

  • ring
  • ring
  • ring
  • ring
ring

Lamb Ring by Mosheh Oved

London, 1940s
Silver, gold
Weight 26.1 gr.; circumference 50.58 mm.; US size 5 1/2; UK size L; 10.9 mm. at widest point; 30.7 mm. long

USD $14,000

Mosheh Oved was the founder and owner of a renowned antique shop, named Cameo Corner, in the Bloomsbury area of London, near the British Museum. He was an authority on antique jewelry, a writer, sculptor, and poet. His first animal rings were created during the bombing raids of London during the Second World War. Amid one of these raids his wife Sah Oved, a jeweler in her own right, observed how Mosheh’s hands were trembling. Whilst sheltering in the basement of the shop she would give him some modelling wax to steady his hands, and that is when the series of animal rings began. His first attempts were either lambs or a kid on shaky legs. Another touching story from this period is that Mosheh made a ring shaped like a wounded lamb from the metal of his own cuff links as a spontaneous act of giving and sympathy for a client who had recently lost his son in battle.

Description:
The heavy silver ring is modelled as a lamb standing on a base with a round opening which forms the hoop. His head with golden eyes is leaning downwards as is his tail. The surface of the silver is hammered to give the lamb a more naturalistic appearance. The ring is in good wearable condition.

Literature:
His autobiography a Who’s Who of his time, is full of anecdotal tales of his international customers and notorieties of the period (Mosheh Oved, Vision and Jewels, Autobiographic in Three Parts, London 1952).  For his animal rings, see: Peter Hinks, Twentieth-Century British Jewellery 1900-1980, London and Boston 1983, p. 96; Elsa Zorn Karlin, Jewelry and Metalwork in the Arts and Crafts Tradition, Atglen, Pennsylvania 1993, p. 86. 

Reference number: 876

You might also like

  • Art Nouveau Ophelia Ring

    France, 1909

  • Art Nouveau Nymph and Satyr Ring by Arvisenet

    France, Paris?, c. 1900

  • Art Nouveau Lady with Pearl Ring

    France or Belgium, c. 1900

  • Watch Ring by Brédillard

    France, Paris, c. 1900-1910

  • Four First World War (or Patriotic) Iron Rings with Inscription “GOLD GAB ICH FÜR EISEN”

    Austro-Hungarian Empire / Germany, 1914-1919

  • “LOVE” Ring by Robert Indiana

    United States, 1969

  • Ionic Capital Rings by Stanley Tigerman

    United States and Italy, 1986-1987

  • Gold and Enamel Band by Giovanni Corvaja

    Italy, Todi, 2013

  • Totentanz Ring by Claude Lévêque

    France, 2015

  • Jewish Wedding Ring

    Central or Eastern Europe (Hungary?), 19th century

  • Jewish Wedding Ring

    Central or Eastern Europe, 18th century

  • Goat Ring by Mosheh Oved

    England, c. 1940

  • Horse Ring by Mosheh Oved

    England, c. 1940

  • Double Bull Ring by Mosheh Oved

    England, c. 1950