Medieval Rings

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JEWISH WEDDING RING

Central or Eastern Europe, 18th century

Gold sheet metal

sold
  • JEWISH WEDDING RING

    Central or Eastern Europe, 18th century
    Gold sheet metal
    Weight 16.8 gr; circumference 59.5 mm; US size 9, UK size R½

    This ring type with three friezes is rare. The quality of the present example is exceptionally good, and it would appear that the ring was originally owned by a wealthy synagogue, which could afford a ring of heavier gold weight. Traditionally, the father of the bride was given a gold coin or other article of value by the groom as a symbolic purchase of the bride and pledge of marriage. Similar customs continue today in non-Jewish tribal communities of the world, and the practice can be traced as far back as the seventh and eighth centuries in Babylonia; it spread to Egypt after the diaspora. The substitution of a ring for the coin is of uncertain date; the earliest known mention of the use of a ring during the Jewish wedding ceremony dates to 1400. This ring consists of a very wide circular band of gold sheet metal with a fine corded wire forming the edging. The inside of the hoop is polished and reveals an inscription in Hebrew letters with the words “Mazal Tov” in abbreviated form

    Provenance: Melvin Gutman (1886–1967), Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, May 15, 1970 Part V, lot 112, as “Venetian … about 1600”; Benjamin Zucker, New York; on deposit, Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, 1985–2013.

    Literature:
    Hindman, et al., Cycles of Life, 2014, cat. no. 13.
    Scarisbrick, Rings: Jewelry of Power, Love and Loyalty, London, 2007 [repr. 2013], no. 160;

    Reference number: 620

  • Filigree

    Ornamental work composed of fine grains or beads, or sometimes of wires soldered to a background but often left as openwork.

  • Later

    It is virtually impossible to do justice to the evolution of jewelry from the Baroque period (c. 1700) to Modern times in a short synopsis, but these are a few highlights. Many of the functional aspects of finger-rings continued: they served for betrothal and marriage, for signing and family identification, for memorial purposes, as well as for pure ornament. However, some new types of rings emerge during this period: such as puzzle rings, gimmick rings, perfume rings, and rings that celebrated scientific achievements (e.g., watch rings) are but a few of the examples.

    This time span witnesses the emergence of the “archaeological style,” of which the work of Fortunato Pio Castellani in the 1830s to 1860s is a particularly well-known example, one that fits in the Neo-Classical period. We see the flourishing of other styles related to artistic movements in painting, sculpture, and architecture. These include Art Nouveau and the Arts and Crafts Movement, both beginning around the 1880s, and Art Deco in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s. It also covers the emergence of some of the most famous twentieth-century houses of jewelry, such as Cartier, Charmet, Boucheron, Bulgari, Tiffany’s, Van Cleef & Arpels, and Mellerio, to mention only a few. Jewelry historians responsible for exhibitions in major museums have begun to trace the historical contributions and characterize the styles of jewelry, including rings, not only of these different artistic movements, but also of these great houses.

    Two other sometimes-overlapping categories of later jewelry are of significant import. The first category, “artist jewelry,” consists of jewelry by artists mostly known for their work in other media, such as Picasso, Calder, Dali, Robert Indiana, Louise Bourgeois, Yves Klein, Anish Kapoor, and many others. The second category, “studio jewelry” includes work by modern and contemporary goldsmiths. Among those practicing today of special mention are Wendy Ramshaw and others belonging to the Goldsmith’s Company in London, dedicated to continuing the craft since it received its first royal charter in 1327. Others of different national origins include the Italian Giovanni Corvaja (handled by Adrian Sassoon in London), the American Joel Arthur Rosenthal or JAR of Paris (whose international exhibition was staged at the Metropolitan Museum in New York in 2013), Otto Jakob of Germany, and the newcomer Wallace Chan of China. The experienced viewer-collector, as well as the newcomer to the field, can begin to learn about modern jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston with its dedicated jewelry gallery and specialized curator, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London which houses the William and Judith Bollinger Gallery, and the private collection of Alice and Louis Koch.

JEWISH WEDDING RING

Central or Eastern Europe, 18th century
Gold sheet metal
Weight 16.8 gr; circumference 59.5 mm; US size 9, UK size R½

This ring type with three friezes is rare. The quality of the present example is exceptionally good, and it would appear that the ring was originally owned by a wealthy synagogue, which could afford a ring of heavier gold weight. Traditionally, the father of the bride was given a gold coin or other article of value by the groom as a symbolic purchase of the bride and pledge of marriage. Similar customs continue today in non-Jewish tribal communities of the world, and the practice can be traced as far back as the seventh and eighth centuries in Babylonia; it spread to Egypt after the diaspora. The substitution of a ring for the coin is of uncertain date; the earliest known mention of the use of a ring during the Jewish wedding ceremony dates to 1400. This ring consists of a very wide circular band of gold sheet metal with a fine corded wire forming the edging. The inside of the hoop is polished and reveals an inscription in Hebrew letters with the words “Mazal Tov” in abbreviated form

Provenance: Melvin Gutman (1886–1967), Sotheby Parke Bernet, New York, May 15, 1970 Part V, lot 112, as “Venetian … about 1600”; Benjamin Zucker, New York; on deposit, Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, 1985–2013.

Literature:
Hindman, et al., Cycles of Life, 2014, cat. no. 13.
Scarisbrick, Rings: Jewelry of Power, Love and Loyalty, London, 2007 [repr. 2013], no. 160;

Reference number: 620

Filigree

Ornamental work composed of fine grains or beads, or sometimes of wires soldered to a background but often left as openwork.

Later

It is virtually impossible to do justice to the evolution of jewelry from the Baroque period (c. 1700) to Modern times in a short synopsis, but these are a few highlights. Many of the functional aspects of finger-rings continued: they served for betrothal and marriage, for signing and family identification, for memorial purposes, as well as for pure ornament. However, some new types of rings emerge during this period: such as puzzle rings, gimmick rings, perfume rings, and rings that celebrated scientific achievements (e.g., watch rings) are but a few of the examples.

This time span witnesses the emergence of the “archaeological style,” of which the work of Fortunato Pio Castellani in the 1830s to 1860s is a particularly well-known example, one that fits in the Neo-Classical period. We see the flourishing of other styles related to artistic movements in painting, sculpture, and architecture. These include Art Nouveau and the Arts and Crafts Movement, both beginning around the 1880s, and Art Deco in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s. It also covers the emergence of some of the most famous twentieth-century houses of jewelry, such as Cartier, Charmet, Boucheron, Bulgari, Tiffany’s, Van Cleef & Arpels, and Mellerio, to mention only a few. Jewelry historians responsible for exhibitions in major museums have begun to trace the historical contributions and characterize the styles of jewelry, including rings, not only of these different artistic movements, but also of these great houses.

Two other sometimes-overlapping categories of later jewelry are of significant import. The first category, “artist jewelry,” consists of jewelry by artists mostly known for their work in other media, such as Picasso, Calder, Dali, Robert Indiana, Louise Bourgeois, Yves Klein, Anish Kapoor, and many others. The second category, “studio jewelry” includes work by modern and contemporary goldsmiths. Among those practicing today of special mention are Wendy Ramshaw and others belonging to the Goldsmith’s Company in London, dedicated to continuing the craft since it received its first royal charter in 1327. Others of different national origins include the Italian Giovanni Corvaja (handled by Adrian Sassoon in London), the American Joel Arthur Rosenthal or JAR of Paris (whose international exhibition was staged at the Metropolitan Museum in New York in 2013), Otto Jakob of Germany, and the newcomer Wallace Chan of China. The experienced viewer-collector, as well as the newcomer to the field, can begin to learn about modern jewelry at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston with its dedicated jewelry gallery and specialized curator, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London which houses the William and Judith Bollinger Gallery, and the private collection of Alice and Louis Koch.

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